Dr Boyd Hunter

Dr Boyd Hunter

Position: Senior Fellow
School and/or Centres: Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research

Email: boyd.hunter@anu.edu.au

Phone: 02 6125 8207

Location: Rm 2153, Copland Building

Qualification:

BA, Australian National UniversityPost GradDip (Economics and Public Policy), ANUMEc, Australian National UniversityPhD (Economics), Australian National University

Researcher profile: https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/hunter-bh

Boyd Hunter is IZA Research Fellow and Senior Fellow at the Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Research School of Social Sciences, The Australian National University, where he has worked for 20 years. He has been the Managing Editor and Editor of the Australian Journal of Labour Economics since 2008. He is currently editor-in-chief of the Australian Journal of Social Issues, the official publication of the Australian Social Policy Association (& only social policy journal in Australia).

His contribution to the literature is reflected in over 120 peer reviewed publications, many of which are in highly ranked journals that span many social science disciplines. At last count, he had over 3200 scholarly citations. In addition to his extensive engagement with labour economics and social policy debates, he has considerable expertise in a range of social sciences fields: criminology, econometrics, economic history, geography, poverty analysis, survey design and analysis, and of course, Indigenous economic policy. He was recently awarded, along with John Carmody, the 2015 Sir Timothy Coghlan Prize for the best article in Australian Economic History Review for the paper 'Estimating the Aboriginal population in early colonial Australia: the role of chickenpox reconsidered'.

He convenes the Bachelor of Philosophy (Honours), or PhB program, program for the College of Arts and Social Sciences, including the Advanced Studies Unit subjects: 'Thinking Research' and 'Doing Research'. He also convenes the third year undergraduate course 'The Indigenous Economy' (INDG3003), which analyses the economic history of how Indigenous modes of production have been transformed from a hunter gatherer economy into an Indigenous economy that is increasingly integrated into the modern capitalist economy

 

Updated:  2 December 2017/Responsible Officer:  Centre Director/Page Contact:  CASS Marketing & Communications